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Setting the proper preload for the rear suspension

Luis

Active member
G
It absolutely helped me out! I did 20 turns, and it rides like a whole new bike. Honestly, this was the only thing I wasn’t satisfied with. And, my Mustang seat has been ordered with a backrest. This really was a game changer and so simple to do. I added a few pictures for everyone to get a visual.

Thanks for the tip
It absolutely helped me out! I did 20 turns, and it rides like a whole new bike. Honestly, this was the only thing I wasn’t satisfied with. And, my Mustang seat has been ordered with a backrest. This really was a game changer and so simple to do. I added a few pictures for everyone to get a visual.

Thanks for the tip!
Great! Btw, the backrest is uncomfortable if you’re 180cm (6ft) tall (or more). It makes you seat forward, and forward there is not enough room
 
Many of the early reviews and many of the first customers have complained about the R18 having a very harsh ride and easily scraping the pegs. This is not indicative of a design flaw on the R18, but a procedural miss by BMW to properly document the unpacking and setup procedures for the customer. During shipping, the rear shock preload is placed in "Shipping" position. That means the adjustment of the rear shock is turned anti-clockwise until it hits the stop. In this position you are basically sitting on the rubber bump-stop on the shock with little to no spring action. During shipping it keeps the bike from bouncing around. The manual mentions setting the preload, but it appears that none of the dealers have been doing that. I have created a chart that gives a breakdown of preload from minimum adjustment (0 Turns) to Max Adjustment (26 Turns).

The process is very easy: With a 13mm 6-Point socket, turn the adjuster anti-clockwise until it stops. Slowly rotate the adjuster clockwise until you feel it engage the spring perch (you will feel slight resistance). This is position "0" Continue turning clockwise until you reach the desired preload based on the chart I created.

I hope this helps everyone out.
Great info. My dealer moved it a few turns… Based on my weight, I have a few to go.
 
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Gr8adv

Member
Ok guys. Measure it the right way. Don't guess by manuals and rider weight. It takes almost no time. You should be doing this with every bike you own.
 

MilwDave

New member
Well I adjusted mine today after picking the bike up on Wednesday. I don’t know if it was in full lock but it want adjusted anywhere near the six turns I need based on the charts.
I’m looking forward to putting some miles on tomorrow.
 
Good to hear you’re getting it straightened out. It’sa whole different bike when this is done correctly.

Wishing you the best.
Have been adjusting these settings on each ride based on my 84 Kg body weight. This alone would represent 4 turns but taking into account leathers, boots, fuel etc I am up to around 8 turns. Improving all the time.
 
First time I’ve had to compare notes. I’m experiencing the same with willingness to make adjustments. My dealer had the setting at 4 turns. First thing I learned was to put a mark on the adjuster after feeling resistance from full counter clockwise. I started with 8 full turns, and am at 10 now. I weigh 227 lbs and and feel significant improvement in ride quality.
 
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